JUICE AND YOUR CHILD

Juice is delicious and can be included as part of a balanced healthy diet.

Juice comes from both fruit and vegetables – both of which play an important part in keeping our bodies healthy. We encourage kids to eat more fruit and vegetables, but for those fussy eaters, one glass of juice per day can be a healthy choice to get some of the most important nutrients into them.

The New Zealand Ministry of Health recognises that one 250ml glass of fruit juice can count as one of the recommended five or more servings of fruit and vegetables a day for older children (noting that it is high in energy and does not replace all of the fibre that the other four servings will deliver).

A few years back, the NZBC consulted with paediatric dentists and dietitians to develop guidelines on juice for children. These remain relevant. The New Zealand Beverage Council strongly believes that straight or undiluted juice should not be given to infants.

For children the following guidelines apply:

0 – 1 year: breast milk, infant formula and water are the only recommended beverages for babies.

1 - 2 years: dilute juice at least 1 part juice to 3 parts water. Restrict intake.

2 - 5 years: dilute juice at least 1 part juice to 1 part water and encourage drinking juice with meals rather than between. Restrict intake.

6 - 12 years: one glass of fruit juice, taken with meals, can count as one of your recommended five or more servings of fruit and vegetables a day.

Source: Paediatric Dentists and Dietitians recommendations (May 2003)


Parents and caregivers have a first-line responsibility for the health and well-being of New Zealand children.

1. WATER FIRST

2. MILK SECOND

3. JUICE LAST.


It's good to drink juice in conjunction with food.

Juice is a good source of Vitamin C, so it assists in the absorption of iron found in food like bread, cereals and plant foods. Also, the saliva generated by eating helps to protect teeth by washing fruit sugar and acid away. This, along with brushing teeth regularly, helps minimise the possibility of any dental cavities caused by sweet food or drink.

For children over the age of six, one glass of fruit juice can count as one of the recommended five or more servings of fruit and vegetables a day.

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